First part : Fast Provisioning Citrix Xenapp 6 with Worker Groups and Policies 1/3 Second part : Fast Provisioning Citrix Xenapp 6 with Worker Groups and Policies 2/3 This is now the third and last part, now you know what are Worker Groups and how to manage Policies, I will show a fast XenApp 6 provisioning. Before I would like to focus a bit on how to troubleshot Policies. XenApp Policies Troubleshooting This schema is very important, once you know which policy take over the other one, everything will be clear. This is not really troubleshooting policies but more how to understand you Resultant Set of Policy (RSoP) If you arrive on a Citrix XenApp 6 environment and there are IMA Policies and Group Policies define, if you need to understand and clear it out, there is a way with GPMC.msc and the Group Policy Results : When launching this tool, you will need to follow a very easy step by step wizard to select the XenApp server and the user you want to include in you Resultant Set of Policy and here is the result : You will be able to read in this report : The Resultant Set of Policy, what is really apply to the XenApp server and the user you selected. The Policies, IMA, GP or LGP not apply because of Policies priorities So if you wonder why the new Policy setting you just implement in you Citrix Delivery Services Console is not applying, you can see with this report it might be because a Group Policy is setting the same parameters and whatever what you do with your IMA Policy about this setting, it won't be apply. Should you use Group Policies or IMA Policies ? To this question, some would say, whatever which one you use, you can configure the exact same settings. I answer yes but : If you choose one way, stick with it and don't mix both because you will get lost and lose a lot of time trying to understand which policy is blocking the one you're trying to deploy. If you have rights in the Active Directory to create OU and Policies, I would suggest you use Group Policy only, the you'll will have only one console (GPMC.msc for ex) to manage all your GPOs and XenApp Policies. In the other side, if you don't have any access to…

Now you know a bit more about Worker Groups (cf Fast Provisioning Citrix XenApp 6 with Worker Groups and Policies 1/3) I can continue with the fast provisioning and policies part. What's new regarding Policies ? XenApp 6 policies changed a lot, first change, you don't need to launch a Citrix Management Console (Java old console), you can access it from the Citrix Delivery Services Console, a node named Policies is here, waiting for a click. Here is CDSC (Citrix Delivery Services Console) screenshot : For the non familiar with this management console, I will just point the different sections focusing on the policies part. This is the Policies node, when selected, the right pane popup with Policies informations In XenApp 6, policies have been split in two parts, User Policies and Computer Policies (GPO like) Here is the list of IMA Policies created with for example, the Allow Local Drive Mapping one I created for the example. This is a summary of the parameters set in the selected policy This is the filter apply to the selected policy above (here this policy allow the Worker Group XE_CEC). New feature extended to Active Directory Group Policies But, the new Policies feature extend the new view in the CDSC, you can now set your XenApp Policies in the Active Directory and administer the same way you administer your GPOs. What does it means ? Wherever you set your farm settings, in the CDSC and/or in the Active Directory, possibilities and result are the same. The following diagram has been draw by Juliano Malander and this is the best way to "show" the two new ways to use Policies in XenApp 6. In blue color is the "classic" way using IMA Policies (in the lower part of the diagram) and on the upper part the "new" way to use Policies, in Group Policies stored in the Active Directory (SYSVOL) Only one console was too perfect, as soon as you chose to set your XenApp Policies in the Active Directory, you will need to use another console like Group Policy Management Console (From Microsoft, gpmc.exe) How does it work ? I made the following schema to show where are stored XenApp policies and how it apply to users and computers : When you using Group Policies, information is stored in the SYSVOL share When you are using IMA Policies, information is stored in the DataStore…

Worker Groups and Policies are some of the feaures included in Citrix XenApp 6. I know this version isn't deployed wildly and tehre are many reasons I won't speak about here; you can still read a blog and very interresting comments about that here : http://www.archy.net/2010/09/21/citrix-xenapp-6-why-it-doesnt-spread/ I work with Citrix Education to build exams for XenApp 6 Basic Administration and Advanced Administation and in order to do it, I needed to know every XenApp 6 new features. I tried everything with the Technical Preview release when XenApp 6 was still XenApp for Windows 2008 R2. Now I want to share and blog about two major features, Worker Groups and Policies because I think it can dramatically improve your productivity and accelerate your deployments. What are Worker Groups ? Worker groups are collections of XenApp servers, residing in the same farm, that are managed as a single unit. Using worker groups, you can: Streamline application publishing to multiple farm servers Load balance access to published resources Filter policies so that settings are applied only to sessions hosted on a specific set of farm servers When using worker groups, consider the following: A farm server can belong to multiple worker groups A worker group can include any number of XenApp servers or none at all Only servers that belong to the same XenApp farm are included in a worker group Above writting is the Citrix definition, I made a shorter version bellow : Manage XenApp servers collectively as “worker groups” Assign published applications and policies to worker groups Worker groups contain farm servers or domain OUs Servers added to a worker groups inherit settings, policies, applications  and Load Balancing Policies Using Worker Group to publish applications The "old" way to publish application is : adding a new XenApp server then opening each published application properties to add the new server. The new server is on the right and multiple actions need to be taken before making the server available to users with the same published application as the other XenApp serveurs. You can still publish your applications this way with XenApp 6. The "new" way using Worker Groups is much more simple. Instead of publishing your application to XenApp servers, you choose a Worker Group. The Worker Group I created is based on Active Directory OU, so every time a XenApp server is move in to the correct OU, as published applications are…

Citrix XenApp 6 is one year old product already and still not wide deployed (In my country at least, France). Why ? I think about two reasons : Mostly because you can install XenApp 6 only on Microsoft Windows 2008 R2 which is only 64Bits operation system from Microsoft and because there are many features just disappearing from this version but a lot of new ones. XenApp 6 : No more Installation Manager (Just remain a read only console to deploy past packages) No more Resource Manager (EdgeSight is suppose to do the job) No more Access database for the DataStore, now it's replace by MS SQL Express 2008 No possibilities to have mixed farms Farms settings are now store in IMA and/or Global policies New feature, Worker Groups New feature, Global Policy (XenApp Policies in the Active Directory) New management console (Only one !) Citrix Delivery Services Console, at last ;) Simplified Install HDX RealTime Collaboration & HDX RealTime audio These is the main part, I think admins and Engineer used to XenApp 5, 4.5, Presentation Server 4, Metaframe Presentation Server 3, Metaframe XP, Metaframe 1.8 etc... are used to have new features but no new way to think their XenApp architecture and administration. Introduction Worker Groups dramatically change the way of thinking publishing application, settings policies up, configuring a farm or several farms. It might be a too radical change for most of us even if you still can think, administrate using the "old" way. Microsoft Windows 2008 R2 is a 64Bit system, and I can assure you, it doesn't bite ! I don't understand why so many Engineers and Consultants I went to meet are afraid to try this OS, just because you need to test applications. Of course 16Bits applications will remain in 32Bit Windows 2003 or Windows 2008, but why on earth guys are afraid to try ? We are using Citrix XenApp, don't forget most of the accesses are made through a Web Interface and you can still have the possibility to keep a PS4/XenApp 5 farm aside a XenApp 6 one. Finaly if you're really not familliar with application migrations and processes to follow, you can still call me ;) This blog is an introduction to the next one Fast Provisioning Citrix Xenapp 6 with Worker Groups and Policies

This issue is tricky because you need to know XenServer very well and understand the error message bellow while trying to launch a VM. The VM Needs storage that cannot be seen from that host I attached a CIFS with all ISOs files I needed to the XenServer and the machine where the ISOs where failled. With this message I had to understand the VM didn't want to boot because one ISOs was mounted in the virtual DVD drive and this ISOs wasn't available any more... I just had to empty the VM's virtual DVD drive and everything came back to normal. I am looking for a command line to empty virtual CD / DVD, if anyone have it, feel free to comment !

This information can be very usefull when you're stuck with a never ending tryin' rebooting VM. First you need to know the target VM UUID, very easy just type the command line : Then you will have the output with the requested information (UUID) and it should look like that : Finally, just use the following command line to force the VM reboot : Have fun :)